According to the most recent Marquette Law School poll released Wednesday, presumptive Democratic nominee for president Hillary Clinton keeps up her lead in Wisconsin.

Among registered voters polled, 43 percent supported Clinton and 37 percent supported presumptive Republican candidate Donald Trump — a six point spread. Support was similar in last month’s poll, with Clinton at 42 percent and Trump at 35 percent.

While Clinton has maintained her lead on Trump since the last poll — which was in June — support for Democrats has only risen 1 percent, compared to Republican’s 2 percent.

But 11 percent of registered Wisconsin voters said they will vote for neither candidate — a decrease from 17 percent since June.

Wisconsin voter support tips toward Democrats in presidential raceAccording to the most recent Marquette Law School poll released Wednesday, presumptive Democratic nominee for president Hillary Clinton has taken Read…

U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, D-Vermont, officially endorsed Clinton this week in an attempt to unify Democrats against Trump.

Sixty-eight percent of Sanders supporters said they would vote for Clinton, but 9 percent said they would vote for Trump instead. Twenty-three percent of Sanders supporters said they would vote for neither, not vote at all or didn’t know.

With Clinton and Trump left as the presumptive nominees, a four-way matchup with Libertarian candidate Gary Johnson and Green Party candidate Jill Stein showed Clinton at 40 percent support, Trump at 33 percent, Johnson at 10 percent and Stein 4 percent. Twelve percent of respondents said they won’t vote for any of the candidates, won’t vote at all or are still unsure of how they will vote.

According to poll results, Republican voters are slightly more likely to vote in the presidential race than Democrats. Among Republicans, 80 percent said they will absolutely vote in November, a 2 percent rise since last month’s poll. Among Democrats, certainty of voting fell from 84 to 78 percent since June.

While Clinton’s favorability among voter stayed steady at 36 percent, Trump’s favorability increased since June, rising from 26 to 29 percent.

As for Wisconsin’s U.S. Senate race, former U.S. Sen. Russ Feingold, D-Wisconsin, rose three points to 48 percent support, while Republican incumbent U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wisconsin, maintained 41 percent support since the June poll.

Gov. Scott Walker’s approval continues to decline, with 38 percent approval among voters compared to 39 percent in June.

Respondents were also asked whether or not they think marijuana should be “legalized and regulated like alcohol.” Fifty-nine percent said it should be legalized, 39 percent said it shouldn’t.

When the Marquette poll last asked about marijuana in September 2014, 51 percent said it should not be legal, while 46 percent said it should be legalized.