Gov. Scott Walker spent his 49th birthday speaking to College Republicans Wednesday about the fundamental differences between Republicans and Democrats in light of the Nov. 8 elections.

Walker said Democrats believe in top-down government solutions while Republicans believe in ground-up individual action. He said that as long as people don’t hurt the health and safety of their neighbors, they should be able to control their own lives.

“We want to do it ourselves,” Walker said. “And as a Republican, we should be able to proudly tell people that we believe government should be limited to the things that we cannot do on our own.”

College Republicans, Democrats debate election issuesCollege Republicans and Democrats went head-to-head in a forum debate on issues relevant to next week’s elections, including education, foreign policy Read…

The governor highlighted the importance of assembly and senate races, specifically referencing the Marquette Law School poll released Wednesday that placed Republican U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson and Democratic challenger Russ Feingold at a near tie.

One point separates Johnson and Feingold among likely voters in Wisconsin with Johnson receiving 44 percent of voters’ support to Feingold’s 45 percent.

“This election is not just important for Wisconsin,” Walker said. “This election may very well determine who controls the majority in the United States Senate.”

Considering the current balance of Republicans and Democrats in the Senate, Walker said electing Johnson could be the only chance of maintaining partisan checks and balances in the federal government should Democratic Presidential Candidate Hillary Clinton win on Nov. 8.

Clinton retains lead in Wisconsin pollDemocratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton continues to lead Republican candidate Donald Trump in Wisconsin, though the margin has changed incrementally since Read…

Walker said though he doesn’t wholly agree with what Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump says, he does not consider Clinton fit for office.

“I do not embrace or support everything that Donald Trump has said or done recently or in the past,” Walker said. “He wasn’t my first pick.”

The governor said House Speaker Paul Ryan has a proactive, positive, optimistic vision for the agenda, and a Republican president would get “around 90 percent of what they’re pushing.”

Backing the Republican Senate nominee, Walker commended Johnson’s background in the manufacturing business and spoke to the importance of dealing with economic issues like unemployment and the deficit.

College Republicans officially endorse Donald Trump for presidentThe University of Wisconsin’s chapter of College Republicans Monday officially endorsed Republican nominee Donald Trump for president. In a statement, Read…

“Probably one of the most damning things and one of the most concerning things, not just for everyday citizens, but particularly for those of you looking to graduate in the next few years and enter the workforce, is what are the percentage of adults actually in the workforce,” Walker said.

Walker said Wisconsin has one of the highest employment rates in the country at nearly 69 percent while national employment rates have been the lowest in the past few years since 1977 at about 62 percent.

Walker said republicans have also balanced the budget and gotten state and local governments headed in the right direction. He said though he is no longer on the ballot, people need to vote in all the races on the ballot.

As Election Day approaches, Walker encouraged attendees to speak out and discuss the importance of this election with friends and coworkers.

“You’d be surprised [at] the impact,” Walker said.