Following Tuesday’s decision to send Rebecca Dallet to the state Supreme Court, Democrats believe the state may finally be leaning blue again.

With historically high voter turnout, Milwaukee County Judge Dallet won a seat on the Wisconsin Supreme Court. Dallet beat out Sauk County Judge Michael Screnock by a 56 to 44 percent margin.

Many Democrats, including Democratic Party of Wisconsin Chair Martha Laning, see this win as a turning point for Wisconsin politics.

“Wisconsinites are taking action to defend our Wisconsin values of fairness, kindness, opportunity and community. And we are winning,” Laning said. “Republicans like Scott Walker have refused to listen to Wisconsinites, and they will have to answer for this inattention and neglect in November.”

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The Democratic Party of Wisconsin said in a statement that they coordinated a campaign that used a grassroots, neighbor-to-neighbor voter structure to secure victory.

The new format is modeled after former President Barack Obama’s successful “community team” field program, which incorporates “progressive enthusiasm” in Wisconsin, the statement said.

The Democratic National Committee Chair Tom Perez echoed the sentiments of the Democratic Party of Wisconsin in a press release Wednesday, saying Tuesday’s election turnout is another example of a broader movement across the country.

“Tonight’s results are the latest example of the unprecedented energy we’re seeing across the country,” Perez said. “The DNC is proud to have worked closely with the Democratic Party of Wisconsin to support their work to organize, engage voters, and win more seats up and down the ballot in 2018.”

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Counties in southwestern and central Wisconsin, as well as key northern counties, were broadly blue in the election, particularly those in Fox Valley.

While only 22 percent of voters participated in this election, it was a historically high turnout of voters for a spring election.

For Democrats, this election meant continuing to push for a higher voter turnout and a unified group of voters, Laning said. She believes Tuesday’s election will encourage more people to vote.

“Wisconsin voters have emphatically rejected corruption, and instead voted to have fairness and independence restored to our courts,” Laning said. “One thing is clear: blue voters across Wisconsin are organized and energized for November.”