Madison’s own dream punk band Slow Pulp released their second EP, EP2, shortly before spring break. The band certainly lived up to their name for this piece with vibes equally dreamy and equally smashin’.

The EP was released with a party at The Frequency, accompanied by openers Dash Hounds and closer Ian Carroll.

The show was a riot — when previously released single from the album, “Die Alone,” came on, the crowd went wild. Both songs from EP1 and EP2 were played, giving fans a chance to hear both their favs as well as those to fall in love with. Another notable new hit was “Husband Pillow,” resulting in high energy moshing.

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Slow Pulp provided an overall groovy night. Their new tunes are mesmerizing, and their release show definitely captured that. And as if we couldn’t fall in love with them more, the band gave and is giving away proceeds from their custom CD sales to YWCA in Madison.

The album itself features six high-powered jams with subsequent lengthy and psychedelic intervals. This follows the trend of their last EP, though this time the group has been gifted the voice of Emily Massey, the newest member of the band.

Her voice is most notable on “Preoccupied,” pleasantly light, airy and dreamy. The track itself seems to put listeners up in the clouds, aided along by guest Nathan France’s oh-so-smooth saxophone.

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Lyrics to this song are highly relatable, especially for us young folks yearning for that one love we just can’t get our of our heads — “I’m preoccupied with you, I fantasize about the day that you’re alone.”

“Bundt Cakes” displays the band’s fluidity by moving quickly back and forth between loud, heavy drums and smooth, guitar-centered verses. This is a track with great dancing opportunity.

The most psychedelic-heavy tune on the EP is “Die Alone,” again, released prior to the rest of the tracks. The melody offers interludes between the verses that seemingly have a bunch of clashing guitar notes, but somehow they fit perfectly together to create an irresistible and lasting impression on listeners.

Overall, Slow Pulp’s EP 2 shows the band’s growth, while still remaining true to the sound captured in their earlier collection — their energy and rhythm-based movement is something fans can still find on these new tracks.

Check out this brief audio interview (by yours truly) detailing what it took to get there: