Independent Student Newspaper Since 1969

The Badger Herald

Independent Student Newspaper Since 1969

The Badger Herald

Independent Student Newspaper Since 1969

The Badger Herald

Advertisements
Advertisements

Melting snow flows over streets

Aside from lifting spirits, this weekend?s warmer temperatures and sunny skies also brought torrents of melted ice-mound water streaming down sidewalks and city streets, prompting the Madison Fire Department to warn citizens about the dangers of winter flooding and offer preventative advice.

Flooding is a concern for sidewalks, city streets and homes, and the MFD?s advice from a release Friday covered all three areas.

Residents should watch their footing while walking outside, as rain, warm temperatures and melting snow mounds make sidewalks and roads slippery, the release said.

Advertisements

In addition, residents can help reduce flooding by clearing the ice and snow around their homes. Removing snow and ice from fire hydrants and storm drain inlets will allow water to drain easier, the release said.

The city has been working diligently to keep everyone safe during the warm temperatures, Al Schumacher, Madison’s city streets superintendent, said.

He said members from the city’s Engineering Services have been working every day, including weekends, for the last two weeks trying to clear and open up storm sewers with bobcats, skid loaders and other heavy machinery.

The MFD advised homeowners to know how their sump pumps work and how to safely turn off the power in their homes. Residents, MFD advises, should also be aware of the dangers of flooding combined with fallen power lines and electrical equipment.

According to the MFD, it is OK to call 911 in situations involving downed wires, if flooding threatens your home?s electrical service, if people are in danger, or in case of fires, injuries and medical emergencies.

Schumacher offered advice for the safety of automobile drivers. When traveling and driving, slow down, he said. Many cars have electric starters and electronic systems that can be damaged by water.

?[Automobile drivers] should really be careful,? Schumacher said.

Dane County Lieutenant Brian Hayes said so far there have been no calls to the Sheriff?s office regarding emergency flood situations.

?We do get calls of cars stuck in puddles,? Hayes said.

Schumacher said people can help themselves, their neighbors and the city if they know the location of storm sewers and can help clear ice and snow from the area.

According to Schumacher, the city wants to be aware of uncleared storm sewers and urged people to call City Engineering with alerts.

If a flood does occur, the MFD reminded residents that the fire department does not remove water from buildings. Instead, residents are encouraged to use the ?Fire and Water Damage Restoration? section of the Yellow Pages for help with water removal.

According to Emergency Restoration Specialists, Inc., a local service for water removal, there is no set cost for recarpeting a damaged room. The prices range depending on a variety of factors including the size of the room and extent of damage done.

The busiest seasons for the Emergency Restoration Specialists are spring, with heavy rain and flooded basements, and winter, with breaking pipes.

Advertisements
Leave a Comment
Donate to The Badger Herald

Your donation will support the student journalists of University of Wisconsin-Madison. Your contribution will allow us to purchase equipment and cover our annual website hosting costs.

More to Discover
Donate to The Badger Herald

Comments (0)

All The Badger Herald Picks Reader Picks Sort: Newest

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *