The Frequency was overflowing last Thursday night with beanie-covered men and high-waisted-jean-wearing women, all there to lose themselves in the hypnotizing sounds of the independent and lo-fi rock of Alex G.

Cries of “fuck Donald Trump” and “screw everything” rang out during the show followed by an uproar of cheers. This epitomized the atmosphere of the show: a fuck-everything-let’s-just-rock-out-for-a-few-hours attitude.  

The leaders of the head-banging behavior were Alex G supported by LVL UP and Brandon Can’t Dance. Together, they delivered an array of songs that could make people yell and cry within the same breath. With smooth and, at some points, almost-whispered vocal delivery over loud, lo-fi garage rock production, the show was a blend of sounds and emotions.  

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Brandon Can’t Dance and LVL UP didn’t feel like openers. They stood strong and defiantly unique in their own right.  Brandon Can’t Dance poured his heart over synths, noisy guitars and simplistic chords with songs about cigarettes, crying and the fragility of youth.  He conjured nostalgia with skeletal production and airy vocals.  

LVL UP brought loud, gritty sounds from the ’90s with their wide-array of songs.  

All three members rocked out in full-force, switching instruments with ease and comfort.  Together the trio sparked excitement and spilled PBRs with their roaring guitars, punching drums and humble vocals.

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Alex G, however, was the act that the flannel-clad, underground crowd was here for. He did not disappoint. Centering his set around the highlights from his three studio albums, Alex G ended the night with quiet emotion, poignant lyricism and hypnotizing guitars.  His vibrato strained as his voice floated over soaring guitar riffs and thundering percussion.  Alex G’s live set was more inspiring and poised than his studio sound, which is no small feat.

The venue was perfect for the lo-fi noise all three bands encompassed.  The black chipped paint on the walls, the sweat and beer-drenched wood floor, the red light that drowned the stage and most importantly the eager and attentive crowd made the show an authentic representation of lo-fi culture. The show was messy, loud and sweaty. But that’s what made it feel real and independent.