Take a moment and forget about the religion that is so intimately connected with edifices of worship.  

If one looks at these structures as empty shells without any connotations or presumptions attached to them, these buildings still depict something — the dedication, beauty and art of architecture.  

Photographer and digital artist, Markus Brunetti, strives to extract this beauty in his exhibit “FACADES”, which explores cathedrals, churches and cloisters of Europe with a precise vision.

Featuring hyper-realistic visuals of these historical buildings with extreme detail, full-scale perspectives and an almost obsessive desire to achieve symmetry equate to photography that is, simply put, stunning.

Standing almost 10 feet tall, these photographs take up space. These massive creations pop off the prints, dominate the room and elicit a genuine emotion of awe. When looking directly at a singular piece, it feels like one is witnessing these giants in person, in the cities they live in, standing in their shadows.

Chazen exhibit blows up cathedral photographs with precise detailTake a moment and forget about the religion that is so intimately connected with edifices of worship.   If one Read…

Brunetti has spent years, alongside his long-time collaborator Betty Schoener, to encapsulate rich details on these beautiful, man-made structures alive with emotion and character. Using thousands of shots done through a series of days, weeks, months and even years, Brunetti has achieved a high degree of precision. The end product of combining all of the frames together digitally is amazing.

On the surface, “FACADES” is an exhibit filled with pretty pictures of pretty buildings. But Brunetti’s true artistic ability lies in the way he makes these images feel more than just prints on canvas — they are alive and breathing.

“FACADES: Photographs by Markus Brunetti” will be featured in the Pleasant T. Rowland Gallery at the Chazen Museum of Art from Sept. 2 until Dec. 31.